Antique Izannah Walker Dolls · Izannah Walker Reproduction Doll · Restoration and Conservation · thank you

New Year’s Day ~ Thankful Reflections & Ebullient Hopes

The wheel of the world has turned once again and it is time to welcome in a new year…  Even more so than Thanksgiving, New Year’s is a time that causes me to think about all the things I am thankful for and to consider all of my hopes for the upcoming year.

I AM GRATEFUL…

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I am thankful for the opportunity to study, care for and love the Izannah Walker dolls in my collection. They may not be pristine, perfect examples of Izannah’s work, but each mark of wear and evidence of love holds a special place in my heart.

Everyday I realize how exceedingly fortunate I am to be able to do the things I love.  I can not express how thankful I am to be the current custodian of eight of Izannah Walker’s dolls!  I am constantly amazed that these dolls are mine to love and care for.  It’s been a long time coming, with years upon years of searching and more hours than I can count of work to pay for them.  If you had asked me 25 years ago if I would ever own even one Izannah Walker doll I would have said no, but the longing for one these amazing dolls never waned.  So I continued to search for a doll I could afford and try to save money to pay for her…  It’s good to hold on to your dreams, whatever they are, to continue to strive for your goals and not  get discouraged! It also helps to be tenacious and downright stubborn!  🙂   Because I know that I am blessed, I try to share my Izannahs, both old and new!  I have always been grateful to others who have been kind enough to show me their dolls, in person, in photographs and online, so I attempt to repay my thanks by doing the same – plus adding in bits of my imagination and the world it lives in…  Come by in the months to follow and see the dolls at play ❤

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To my immense surprise and delight, 2016 brought two new Izannah Walker dolls into my little doll family!
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I have named Josephine (on the left) and Eliza Jane (on the right) after two of my great-grandmothers. One of the things I am most looking forward to in 2017 is making reproductions of both of these dolls. The chance to focus on each doll intensely, learn her similarities and differences, and simply enjoy being in their presence for the many hours it takes to make a new reproduction doll for the first time is a treat to look forward to!

THANKS TO YOU…

Thank you all for your support of my work these past 30 years!  I didn’t say much about it, but 2016 was the 30th year I have been making and selling my handwork.

Thank you for your purchases, both large and small!  Thank you for your kind words of encouragement and your compliments.  It is a scary thing to expose items you have lovingly created to the world!  Thank you for making it a rewarding experience, and much less frightening.

Thank you for being the kind of customers and students who turn into friends and brighten my days!

A huge thank you to those who have entrusted their precious dolls to me for restoration!!!  I have appreciated the chance to take care of your treasured dolls, and to carefully undo the worst ravages of time and past accidents.  I learn so much with every doll I have the opportunity to study and observe!  I know I’m slow and cautious when restoring dolls, so thank you also for your patience.

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Emmaline after restoration.
www.izannahwalker.com
A 2nd after restoration photo. The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to “age” the fabric and arm more.

An immense armful of thanks to those few special individuals who feel the same way that I  do about sharing the beauty of Izannah’s dolls, and who have graciously allowed me to make reproductions of their antique Izannah Walker dolls! I truly can not thank you enough. ❤ ❤ ❤

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Lily after I finished her restoration. What a beautiful Izannah Walker doll!
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The Lilys! Sisters, best friends and bosom companions through thick and thin

KNOW YOURSELF

One of the good things about being older is gaining a deeper understanding of yourself!  After a lot of trial and error, I know many of the things that make me happy.  I know that I am the happiest creating beautiful,intricate,  time-consuming things.  I do make and sell a large number of items… and I used to make even more.  Yes, I can make simple, less expensive dolls, bears, clothes, pincushions, etc. etc. etc… but doing that is more like drudgery.  I strive for special, amazing, perfect work.  That is what makes my heart sing.  I may not always reach my ideal, but that doesn’t keep me from trying again and again.  I know this is not the right way for everyone, but it is for me.  So know yourself!  Be kind to yourself and follow the path that is uniquely yours. Don’t follow the crowd, follow your heart! ❤

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cartridge-pleating
Cartridge pleated baby dress.

HOPE FOR THE NEW YEAR

A new year traditionally brings new beginnings.  My hope for 2017 is to be more creative.  To try projects that I’ve been daydreaming of for years. To let that spark of creativity light all the days of this brand new year!!!

My hope for you is that you will be able to turn some of your long held daydreams into reality in 2017, and that you will be surrounded by those you love and care about!  Try something new!  Happy New Year to us all!!!

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Antique Doll Furniture · Antique Izannah Walker Dolls · Celebrations · Doll Accessories · Doll Clothing · Restoration and Conservation

Happy 199th Birthday Izannah Walker – Part 3 – A Very Busy Afternoon

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The kitchen is buzzing with activity, as Eliza Jane, Ismay, Zola and Hannah try to finish all their last minute tasks. “Hurry, hurry our company will be coming soon!” “It’s almost time for the party to start!”
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Eliza Jane has offered to iron all the doll’s party dresses. She is by far the best at ironing, she never scorches the fabric!
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Hannah has just taken the last layer of cake out of the oven. It smells so good… The entire kitchen is filled with the aromas of cinnamon and spices ❤
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Zola is turning the cake layers out of the pans to cool. As soon as they aren’t so warm, Ismay is going to spread sweet, tangy apple butter between the layers, then dust the top of the cake with powdered sugar.
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“Eliza Jane can you see the clock?” “What time is it?” Oh my, we have to hurry up!” “We need to get the cake finished and give Izzybelle her bath!” Eliza Jane, you keep ironing. Zola, you can take the cake out to the table in the yard, and Hannah and I will bathe Izzybelle.” (Ismay can get a bit bossy at times)

 

IZZYBELLE GETS A BATH

Being a doll maker’s doll is a lot like being a shoemakers child, you always come last…  You may remember how terribly bedraggled Izzybelle was when she arrived on my doorstep a couple of years ago.  I finally found just a handful of moments to start cleaning her and making her appropriate replacement arms and legs.  Once upon a time Izzybelle was a charming, small example of one of Izannah Walker’s dolls.  She was loved, played with and almost used up, then sent to the Martha Chase factory for repairs, so that she could be loved and played with some more.  I own several dolls, and have seen and restored a handful of others, that were refurbished by the doll makers working for Martha Chase.

 

 

I have made Izzybelle appropriate restoration arms and legs. I still need to color match them to her newly cleaned paint surface, then stuff and attach them.
I have made Izzybelle appropriate restoration arms and legs. I still need to color match them to her newly cleaned paint surface, then stuff and attach them.

 

"Izzybelle, your bath water is almost ready. Hannah is heating the last kettle full on the stove right now."
“Izzybelle, your bath water is almost ready. Hannah is heating the last kettle full on the stove right now.”
"Izzybelle, time to hop in the tub!"
“Izzybelle, time to hop in the tub!”

 

"Make sure you scrub behind your ears and between your toes."
“Make sure you scrub behind your ears and between your toes.”

 

"This bath feels so good! Why didn't you make me take one sooner???"
“This bath feels so good! Why didn’t you make me take one sooner???”

 

Even Splotches, the barn cat is curious to see what the dolls are doing today. If you are too, please come back around 4:00, 7:00 & 10:00 pm to see the rest of their adventures.
Even Splotches, the barn cat is curious to see what the dolls are doing today. If you are too, please come back around 4:00, 7:00 & 10:00 pm to see the rest of their adventures.

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Restoration and Conservation

A Tale of Two Restorations: Part 1 Lily

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This is Lily when she first arrived at my studio. Note the missing paint on her facial features, the poorly made flat replacement arms, the glued on stockinette covering her original shoulders and the sewn on stockings and leather shoes.

Today I thought I’d share with you the story of Lily and Emmaline, and the journey we shared.  Lily and Emmaline are two very wonderful original antique Izannah Walker dolls that came to me for restoration.  The following is the tale of how they returned to their true selves and regained a glimmer of their youth.

Part 1 Lily’s Story

(Move your cursor over the photographs to read the captions.  Click on the photographs you wish to enlarge)

One day, out of the blue, my dear friend Susie called to tell me that she had purchased an antique Izannah Walker doll.  The doll was in such bad shape that no one else at the doll show she attended was interested in buying her, even though some people did realize that she was one of Izannah’s dolls.  Chief among several issues was the very heavy repaint on the doll’s head and shoulders.  Thinking that she certainly couldn’t make the doll look worse than she already did, Susie gathered her courage and began removing layers of paint.  Finally working her way down to the remains of Lily’s original layer of face paint.  What emerged was a charming, classic pre-patent Izannah Walker doll.  In due course Susie and Lily journeyed to Connecticut and it was agreed that Lily would stay to visit my family of Izannahs while I endeavored to bring back some of her former glory.

Where to start???  One of the challenges I faced with Lily was the glued on, painted piece of stockinette that someone had applied over her entire shoulder area. Obviously there was some reason that they felt the need to do that, but why? I decided to see if I could remove the glue saturated fabric.  Starting in an unobtrusive spot under the edge of her second skin I gently began chipping away very small bits of stockinette/glue/paint.  This was an excruciatingly slow process.  The ill considered repair disappeared a fraction of an inch at a time, to reveal Lily’s original shoulders.  There was a small torn area up near her neck, which I repaired with a little piece of antique fabric.

I used some of the same antique quilt block foundation fabric to make Lily a new pair of arms in the proper size, from a pattern drafted from one of my own antique Izannah Walker dolls and re-scaled to fit Lily’s petite size. After making Lily’s new arms I gave them an appropriate amount of wear and multiple coats of paint that I hand mixed to match her remaining original paint.

Next came the thrill of doing a small amount of judicious in-painting on Lily’s face and shoulders.  Brushing on many whisper thin coats of hand mixed color, always making sure not to get any paint down into the cracks in her paint surface.  Susie is very found of Isabeau, one of my antique Izannah Walker dolls, and we found that when we compared Isabeau and Lily that Lily looks like a smaller version of Isabeau.  Both having been made originally from very similar head molds.  Since all of the paint on Lily’s features was long gone, I took Isabeau to the studio, where she sat with me and modeled as I repainted Lily’s eyes and lips.

The next decision that Susie had to make was whether or not to leave the sewn on stockings and shoes from an earlier repair.  I could tell that Lily’s ankles had once again separated along the seam line, and while the socks were keeping her feet from falling off, they were dangling loose under the red stockinette.  After much consideration it was decided that I should remove the red “socks” and little leather shoes.  When I did I was very pleased to find that Lily had painted shoes!  Not painted boots, but low top shoes.!!!  The original paint did not go above the ankle seam.  This is a fairly rare detail and it made my whole day when I uncovered it. 🙂  I was able to repair Lily’s feet with a few stitches to keep her worn “shoes” in place over their horsehair stuffing.  I used small strips of the antique quilt block foundation to make bands to stabilize her ankle seams.

After getting sweet Miss Lily back to her true self, I turned my attention to her clothing.  She came with a hand sewn red cotton dress trimmed with black velvet ribbon.  The dress is not as old as the doll and while it was made with love, it was not made by an expert seamstress.  The dress also had a great deal of sun fading on the front.  Normally I would not be concerned with the fading, because that is just one of those things that happens to fabric…  However, the dress was quite short and Susie wanted the hem let out if possible.  I tried to find a piece of old black velvet ribbon with similar wear so that I could add it as a second row of trim along the crease of the original hemline (once the hem was let out).  I looked for quite a long time without success.  I wound up letting the hem down, then removing all of the ribbon trim so that I could wash the dress.  Normally I use cold water to wash antique fabrics, but in this instance I used warm, hoping that the red dye would run and even out the  color.  It did run, but the fading was still very evident, as was the fact that I let the hem down.  So I wound up re-dying the dress to it’s original turkey red color.  This evened out the color enough so that it is now acceptable.  Then I sewed the black ribbon back in it’s previous positions, because even after dying the lines where the ribbon was were quite visible.  I also moved the hooks and eyes at the waist to make it smaller.  The dress fits Lily much better now.  since Lily did not come with undergarments, I made her a set from antique fabric and antique waved braid (rick-rack).  As I’ve mentioned Lily’s mom is very fond of my Isabeau, so I recreated Isabeau’s chemise, then made a petticoat and pantalettes to match.

I thoroughly enjoyed having Lily stay here during her transformation.  My doll family is going to be crushed when she leaves, as they have all become fast friends.  I’m sure they will be pen pals for life.

In addition to trusting me with Lily, Susie has been extremely generous.  She told me that she wanted me to make reproductions of Lily and she has allowed me to share this story of Lily’s restoration!  Thank You Susie!!!

And now we come to the end of this chapter in Lily’s continuing story.  Her restoration is finished and she will be going back home.  All of the pieces of her previous repairs will be going with her, as they are mementos of her long, interesting life.

 

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Lily after I finished her restoration. What a beautiful Izannah Walker doll!

Please come back to visit Izannah Walker Journal next week to read Part Two: Emmaline’s Story.

Antique Izannah Walker Dolls · Celebrations · Doll for Sale · Izannah Walker Doll Making Kit · Izannah Walker Reproduction Doll · Ordering a Reproduction Izannah Walker Doll

Happy 198th Birthday Izannah Walker – Part 9 – In Which We Come to the End of Our Story & Say Farewell

“Thank you for coming to our party!” “We’re so glad you could be here.”
“I’m going to miss you!” “Promise me you”ll write.” “I will!”
“Good-bye!” “It’s been such fun!” “We’ve enjoyed having you stay here with us!” “Write to tell us you got home safely!” “Thank you for everything!” “This was the best party ever!”
“I’m going to miss everyone.”
“Me too!”
“I’m sad to see them leave, but it feels so good to put my feet up!”
“At least Lily isn’t leaving yet.” ❤
“I may stay in bed ALL day tomorrow…”
“I’m just going to stay right here on the floor!”

WHAT THEY ARE DOING NOW

Anna is busy packing. She will be leaving here bright and early on Tuesday morning for her new home.
Anna is busy packing. She will be leaving here bright and early on Tuesday morning for her new home.
Billie's doll is ready for her dress fittings and will be leaving here very soon. Look for her upcoming farewell post.
Billie’s doll is ready for her dress fittings and will be leaving here very soon. Look for her upcoming farewell post.
Sharon and I are still talking over the details of this young lady's wardrobe. She'll be happy to model it for you before she goes home. <3
Sharon and I are still talking over the details of this young lady’s wardrobe. She’ll be happy to model it for you before she goes home. ❤
Lily #1 has picked out her dress and jewelry and is patiently waiting for me to make them so that she can go home with her older sister. They plan to quilt together during the winter.
Lily #1 has picked out her dress and jewelry and is patiently waiting for me to make them so that she can go home with her older sister. They plan to quilt together during the winter.
Hannah #1 has found a new home! She will be helping me look through my fabric stash for just the right material for her dress. Once she is finished she will be going home just in time for Christmas. <3
Hannah #1 has found a new home! She will be helping me look through my fabric stash for just the right material for her dress. Once she is finished she will be going home just in time for Christmas. ❤
Hannah #2 Is still available for sale and at this point you may still choose her clothing fabrics and styles. <3 $1250.00 fully dressed with free shipping in the U,S,
Hannah #2 Is still available for sale and at this point you may still choose her clothing fabrics and styles. $1250.00 fully dressed, with free shipping within the U. S. ❤
Lily 2 is also still available for sale. If you love early, worn and primitive then Lily may be just the reproduction Izannah you have been longing for... $1250.00 fully dressed, you may still pick out her clothing if you purchase her now.
Lily 2 is also still available for sale. If you love early, worn and primitive then Lily may be just the reproduction Izannah you have been longing for… $1250.00 fully dressed, you may still pick out her clothing if you purchase her now.
A full instruction book + patterns comes with each head. The unpainted head/kit is $200 and the painted head/kit is $375.
2 Izannah Kits finished and ready to mail – 1 painted & 1 unpainted. A full instruction book + patterns comes with each head. The unpainted head/kit is $200 and the painted head/kit is $375.
Zanna & Izzybelle are still having their tag sale through midnight tonight. ((/27/15)
Zanna & Izzybelle are having their tag sale through midnight tonight. (9/27/15) shop here
and Izzybelle is still to tired to move!
and Izzybelle is still to tired to move!

Thank you for coming to celebrate with us!

Love ❤

Paula, Zanna, Isabeau, Isane, Izzybelle, Ismay, Hannah, & their Providence Cousins

Other Types of Doll Making · Restoration and Conservation

A Wonderful Large Papier-Mache Doll in Need of a Little Loving Assistance

This very large papier-mache doll can wear children's size clothing.
This very large papier-mache doll can wear children’s size clothing.

Today I have been rendering a bit of loving assistance to this damaged, but still beautiful papier-mache doll.  I’ve been asked by her owner to stabilize her condition, more than restore her.  I have glued the very large crack in her head and started repairing the holes in the back of her head.  Her antique underclothing is currently soaking in a solution of Orvis and distilled water.  The idea here is to conserve the doll with a very light touch.  I’m doing just enough to keep her together and stop her from deteriorating further, while allowing the story of her life and enchanting time worn appearance to shine.

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

This doll has a very nice hand sewn body, with magnificent fingers and hands!

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

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Come back to visit next week to see how she looks when I’m finished working on her…

conserving an antique papier-mache doll www.izannahwalker.com

I love these little pink shoes with their scalloped edges <3
I love these little pink shoes with their scalloped edges ❤
Restoration and Conservation

Restorations!

Although I don’t often mention it here on my blog, I do a fair amount of restoration work when I can fit it into my schedule.  During August and September I spent countless hours doing restoration on three antique Izannah Walker dolls, plus a very unique one of a kind antique painted cloth doll.  ❤ ❤ ❤

Helping to preserve and restore antique cloth dolls and their clothing is one of my passions!  Equal parts scary and awe inspiring, restoration work is one of the most rewarding and fulfilling things that I do ❤  As with any type of restoration, less is more. I do the least possible to protect and preserve a doll, while at the same time getting her original beauty to show through her veil of years.

Here are some before and after photographs for all of you, who are equally as smitten with antique painted cloth dolls as I am, to enjoy.  I do make all cloth, historically accurate reproductions of all three of these Izannahs; with pressed cloth heads that I make in molds taken directly from the original antique dolls.  I’d be delighted to make one especially for you ❤

All of my dolls are finely handmade, one at a time, in New England – just over 100 miles from where Izannah Walker lived and worked in Somerset Village, MA and Central Falls, RI. Each doll is historically accurate and requires from 85 – 100 hours to complete.

I’m always happy to talk to you about restoring your antique painted cloth dolls.  paula@asweetremembrance.com  860-355-5709 (9:00 – 6:00 Eastern Time).

A LARGE VERY EARLY IZANNAH WALKER DOLL

Before restoration.
Before restoration.

 

I was asked to bring back some of the original color to the face and shoulders of this early doll. Years of sun fading and a prior overly vigorous cleaning had turned the doll's once skin toned paint almost white.
I was asked to bring back some of the original color to the face and shoulders of this early doll. Years of sun fading and a prior overly vigorous cleaning had turned the doll’s once skin toned paint almost white.

 

The doll's linen second skin also needed repairs and a newly made replacement arm was itself in need of replacement.
The doll’s linen second skin also needed repairs and a newly made replacement arm was itself in need of replacement.

 

Back view prior to restoration work.
Back view prior to restoration work.

 

Fortunately the doll's original paint color was visible on a protected area of her back.
Fortunately the doll’s original paint color was visible on a protected area of her back.

 

After restoration.  The change in color is very subtle.  These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner.  After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to "age" the fabric and arm more.  The upper arm above the replacement is too fragile to clean, which left the dilemma of what color to paint the replaced lower arm... Should it match the other cleaned arm? Or should it match the uncleanable upper arm fragment it is attached too???
After restoration. The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to “age” the fabric and arm more. The upper arm above the replacement is too fragile to clean, which left the dilemma of what color to paint the replaced lower arm… Should it match the other cleaned arm? Or should it match the uncleanable upper arm fragment it is attached too???

 

Another look at the color restoration of the face and shoulders. The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to "age" the fabric and arm more.
Another look at the color restoration of the face and shoulders.
The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to “age” the fabric and arm more.

 

A third after restoration photo.  The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to "age" the fabric and arm more.
A third after restoration photo. The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to “age” the fabric and arm more.

 

After restoration.  The doll's dress is made from very thin fragile wool fabric that has never been washed. It's orogonal long sleeves were cut off at some point. I did some very minor sewing repairs on the dress and washed all of her under garments with museum conservation cleaning products.  The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to "age" the fabric and arm more.
After restoration. The doll’s dress is made from very thin fragile wool fabric that has never been washed. It’s original long sleeves were cut off at some point. I did some very minor sewing repairs on the dress and washed all of her under garments with museum conservation cleaning products.  These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to “age” the fabric and arm more.

 

A 2nd after restoration photo.  The change in color is very subtle. These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to "age" the fabric and arm more.
A 2nd after restoration photo.  These photos were taken before the doll was seen by her owner. After the owner had a chance to see the replaced arm and replaced antique linen upper arm covering, we decided to “age” the fabric and arm more.

 

HEAVILY REPAINTED 18 INCH IZANNAH WALKER DOLL

A sweet 18 inch Izannah with multiply layers of repaint.
A sweet 18 inch Izannah with multiple layers of repaint.

 

My mission was to remove multiple layers of paint to get back down to the original paint on this doll and to remark her very battered replacement arms.
My mission was to remove multiple layers of paint to get back down to the original paint on this doll and to remake her very battered replacement arms.

 

Prior to restoration.
Prior to restoration.

 

These were not the original arms on this doll.
These were not the original arms on this doll.

 

Before any over painting was removed.
Before any over painting was removed.

 

After restoration.  The old replacement arms are being preserved as part of the doll's history.
After restoration. The old replacement arms are being preserved as part of the doll’s history.

 

After restoration.
After restoration.

 

These photos were taken before the restored doll was shown to her owner.  After she got a chance to see the doll, we decided to add additional aging to the new arms.  I always like to consult with owners through out the restoration process to make sure that the cosmetic part of the restoration looks the way they want it to.
These photos were taken before the restored doll was shown to her owner. After she got a chance to see the doll, we decided to add additional aging to the new arms. I always like to consult with owners through out the restoration process to make sure that the cosmetic part of the restoration looks the way they want it to.

 

This is what she looks like after I removed four layers of repaint and did a very small amount of judicious in painting.  As you can see much of her original paint had been worn away, so it is very easy to understand why she received  new coats of paint.
This is what she looks like after I removed four layers of repaint and did a very small amount of judicious in-painting. As you can see, much of her original paint had been worn away, so it is very easy to understand why she received a new coat of paint.

 

After most of the restoration was finished, but before additional aging was added to her newly remade arms.  All of her clothing is freshly washed and aired. <3
After most of the restoration was finished, but before additional aging was added to her newly remade arms. All of her clothing is freshly washed and aired. ❤

 

ISANE

This doll belongs to me.  You may remember seeing previous photos of her here on my blog.

This is a photo of Isane last year shortly after I purchased her.  She had been repainted shortly before she came to live with me.
This is a photo of Isane last year, shortly after I purchased her. She had been repainted not long before coming to live with me.

 

Isane, after I removed all of her recent repaint.
Isane, after I removed all of her recent repaint.

 

Isane during restoration.
Isane during restoration.

 

Isane after restoration.  Because she had suffered significant paint loss and had filler added before the last time she was repainted, I did have to do some in-painting.
Isane after restoration. Because she had suffered significant paint loss and had filler added before the last time she was repainted, I did have to do some in-painting.

 

Isane after restoration.
Isane after restoration.

 

Isane post restoration.
Isane post restoration.

 

Isane as she looks now after restoration.
Isane as she looks now after restoration.

 

Much better!!!  (following restoration)
Much better!!! (following restoration)

 

Isane and I are both happy with the way she looks now <3 (after 60= hours of restoration).
Isane and I are both happy with the way she looks now after I did 60+ hours of restoration work ❤

 

A WONDERFUL ANTIQUE PAINTED CLOTH DOLL

Before I did any restoration work.
Before I did any restoration work.

 

The neck of the doll suffered a lot of wear and tear over the years.  Portions of the painted cloth are missing.
The neck of the doll suffered a lot of wear and tear over the years. Portions of the painted cloth are missing.

 

The back before restoration work.
The back before restoration work.

 

The main thing I had to do to this doll was to keep her very fragile neck from coming completely apart and make sure her head stays attached.
The main thing I needed to do to this doll was to keep her very fragile neck from coming completely apart and make sure her head stays attached to her body.

 

This is how the doll looks after I did a bit of repair to her neck and ankles.
This is how the doll looks after I did a bit of repair to her neck and ankles.

 

Her ankles are still fragile, but all of their stuffing is in place and they are more firmly attached.
Her ankles are still fragile, but all of their stuffing is in place and they are more firmly attached.

 

This is the doll after minor repair to her neck.
This is the doll after minor repair to her neck.

 

Thankfully, after a little restoration work, the back of the neck looks much better.
Thankfully, after a little restoration work, the back of the neck looks much better.

 

The addition of a black velvet ribbon provides support and helps  keep added stress off of the delicate neck.
The addition of a black velvet ribbon provides support and helps keep added stress off of the delicate neck.

 

After restoration  she is ready for her next 150 years!
After restoration she is ready for her next 150 years!

 

Aging gracefully <3
Aging gracefully ❤

 

After restoration.
After restoration.

 

It was a wonderful treat to have this doll come visit for a few weeks while I worked on her :)
It was a wonderful treat to have this doll come visit for a few weeks while I worked on her 🙂